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image: Brazil’s Pre-Zika Microcephaly Cases

Brazil’s Pre-Zika Microcephaly Cases

By | February 10, 2016

A review of four years’ worth of medical records finds far greater numbers of microcephaly cases from before the ongoing Zika virus epidemic than had been officially reported.

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Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 28, 2016

The virus continues to spread as countries issue pregnancy advisories and drug firms pick up on vaccine development.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | January 25, 2016

Health officials expect the virus to spread to nearly all countries in the Americas and expand warnings for pregnant women.

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image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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image: A Century of Science on Stamps

A Century of Science on Stamps

By | January 1, 2016

Countries have used postage stamps to commemorate scientific achievements—sometimes with erroneous zeal—since the early 1900s.

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image: All Together Now

All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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