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image: Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome

Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers detail the major factors shaping the microbiomes that surround us while we work.

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image: Opinion: Target the Vector

Opinion: Target the Vector

By | June 28, 2016

Officials’ increased emphasis on mosquito control could benefit public health efforts beyond the ongoing Zika outbreak. 

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image: Global Air Quality Crisis Continues

Global Air Quality Crisis Continues

By | June 27, 2016

Air pollution is linked to 6.5 million premature deaths each year, according to a study.

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image: Dethroning <em>E. coli</em>?

Dethroning E. coli?

By | June 23, 2016

Some scientists hope to replace microbiology’s workhorse bacterium with fast-growing Vibrio natriegens.

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image: Speaking of Microbiology

Speaking of Microbiology

By | June 21, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting

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image: Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

By | June 20, 2016

Kids often acquire cavity-causing bacteria from non-family members, researchers report at the American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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World Health Organization concludes the events are unlikely to worsen the viral outbreak.

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The World Health Organization now recommends that people who visit areas with Zika virus transmission abstain from or have only protected sex for eight weeks.

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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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