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image: Clinical Trial Data Repressed

Clinical Trial Data Repressed

By | January 5, 2012

A new study finds that important drug safety data are not seeing the light of day.

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Animal Mind Control

By | January 1, 2012

Examples of parasites that manipulate the behavior of their hosts are not hard to come by, but scientists have only recently begun to understand how they induce such dramatic changes.

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image: Resolving Chronic Pain

Resolving Chronic Pain

By | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

76 Comments

Contributors

January 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

By | January 1, 2012

Not all inflammation leads to pain. Despite widespread infection followed by fever, colds rarely cause pain. But when some cytokines and certain immune cells are active near pain-sensing nerves, they trigger receptors that convey pain sensations to the brain.

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image: An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

By | January 1, 2012

Twenty-first century challenges to the public health of all the world’s populations require forward-looking commitments from epidemiologists.

12 Comments

image: Unsilencing a Gene

Unsilencing a Gene

By | December 21, 2011

Scientists have found a way to reactivate a gene in mice that is silenced in a neurodevelopmental disorder called Angelman syndrome.

3 Comments

image: Neuroscience Not Ready for the Courtroom

Neuroscience Not Ready for the Courtroom

By | December 14, 2011

Certain neuroscience techniques are not robust enough to be used as evidence in a trial, a new report says.

6 Comments

image: How Bees Choose Home

How Bees Choose Home

By | December 8, 2011

For honeybees, there’s no place like home. And every year, they must find a new one. Now, a study publishing today (December 8) in Science suggests that the honeybee swarms use inhibitory signals when house-hunting, paralleling the human brain’s decision-making process.

3 Comments

image: Yawns More Contagious Among Friends

Yawns More Contagious Among Friends

By | December 7, 2011

People who are emotionally connected are more likely to catch the yawns from one another.

3 Comments

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