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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

By | February 27, 2017

The World Health Organization outlines critical-, high-, and medium-priority antibiotic development initiatives, calling on the public and private sectors to invest in additional R&D.

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image: Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

By | February 16, 2017

The 49-year-old epidemiologist immigrated to the U.S. in 2000 for a postdoc position. He’s now a professor of family medicine and public health.

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image: Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

By | February 8, 2017

Hans Rosling of the Karolinska Institute has passed away at age 68.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: Suspected Yellow Fever Outbreak in Brazil

Suspected Yellow Fever Outbreak in Brazil

By | January 19, 2017

According to the World Health Organization, relatively low vaccination coverage in the state of Minas Gerais “could favor the rapid spread of the disease.”

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image: Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

By | January 17, 2017

Infected with Wolbachia, the insects are expected to reduce the spread of dengue and Zika. But scientists say the approach may have limitations.

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