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A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

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Pregnant and lactating women are particularly vulnerable to the disease.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Cholera Ripping Through Yemen

Cholera Ripping Through Yemen

By | June 9, 2017

More than 100,000 cases of the bacterial disease have been reported in the war torn country.

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If made law, the American Health Care Act passed today in the US House would eliminate the Obamacare-funded initiative.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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