Advertisement

The Scientist

» public health and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: A Call to Stop H5N1 Research

A Call to Stop H5N1 Research

By | January 23, 2012

Three dozen researchers have signed a letter promising to halt dangerous bird flu research for 2 months to initiate safety discussions.

24 Comments

image: Cracks Form in Anti-Open Access Push

Cracks Form in Anti-Open Access Push

By | January 18, 2012

Academic and commercial publishers disagree on the legislation that would limit public access to federally funded research findings.

3 Comments

image: Killer TB Hits India

Killer TB Hits India

By | January 16, 2012

An incurable form of tuberculosis has turned up on the subcontinent.

9 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Anti-Open Access Rises Again

Anti-Open Access Rises Again

By | January 9, 2012

A newly introduced bill that aims to block public access to publicly-funded research echoes similar bills that have been tried in the past.

30 Comments

image: Clinical Trial Data Repressed

Clinical Trial Data Repressed

By | January 5, 2012

A new study finds that important drug safety data are not seeing the light of day.

0 Comments

Contributors

January 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

An Evolving Science for an Evolving Time

By | January 1, 2012

Twenty-first century challenges to the public health of all the world’s populations require forward-looking commitments from epidemiologists.

12 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Lost Y Chromosome Genes Found on Autosomes
  2. Next Generation: Souped-up Probiotics Pinpoint Cancer
  3. Genomes Point the Way
    Daily News Genomes Point the Way

    Sequence analysis of Egyptian, Ethiopian, and non-African peoples indicates a likely route taken by modern humans migrating out of Africa.

  4. Of Dogs and Men
    The Nutshell Of Dogs and Men

    Clues from an ancient wolf genome are leading scientists to reconsider how long dogs have been people’s companions.

Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Advertisement
Eppendorf
Eppendorf