The Scientist

» public health and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Engineering a Deadly Flu

Engineering a Deadly Flu

By | November 21, 2011

Research on the H5N1 influenza strain has gained the attention of a national biosecurity organization.

0 Comments

image: Mapping Antibiotic Use and Resistance

Mapping Antibiotic Use and Resistance

By | November 17, 2011

New data reveals troubling trends in the pharmaceutical fight against bacteria.

9 Comments

image: Fukushima Radiation Worse Then Feared

Fukushima Radiation Worse Then Feared

By | October 26, 2011

A new analysis suggests that more radioactive contaminants were released from the crippled nuclear power plant then accounted for in official Japanese estimates.

9 Comments

image: Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution

Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution

By | October 21, 2011

Inadequate poultry immunization programs may cause higher mutations rates in the bird flu virus, rendering the vaccine ineffective and increasing the threat of cross-species transmission.

6 Comments

image: Milk: Does It Really Do a Body Good?

Milk: Does It Really Do a Body Good?

By | October 21, 2011

The claim that drinking three glasses of milk per day confers cardiovascular benefits has been withdrawn from a year-old press release issued by a Dutch research institute.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Too Many Mitochondrial Genome Papers
  2. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  3. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Shimadzu Scientific
Shimadzu Scientific
Advertisement
The Scientist