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image: WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

WHO: Sierra Leone Free of Ebola Transmissions

By | November 9, 2015

Like neighboring Liberia, the country has entered a 90-day surveillance period, according to the World Health Organization. Transmission continues at a reduced rate in Guinea.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

Another Retraction for Fake Nutrition Data

By | October 29, 2015

The BMJ yanks a study on baby formula from R.K. Chandra decades after it was published.

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

By | October 27, 2015

Experts discuss the agency’s classification of red and processed meats as probable and confirmed carcinogens, respectively.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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