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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

9 Comments

image: Ebola’s Toll on Healthcare Workers

Ebola’s Toll on Healthcare Workers

By | August 26, 2014

“Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola,” the World Health Organization says.

2 Comments

image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: For Polio, Two Vaccines Work Better Than One

For Polio, Two Vaccines Work Better Than One

By | August 21, 2014

A booster dose of inactivated polio vaccine bolsters the immune system and reduces viral shedding in children already treated with the oral polio vaccine, a study shows. 

1 Comment

image: WHO OKs Experimental Ebola Drugs

WHO OKs Experimental Ebola Drugs

By | August 13, 2014

But biotech firms’ supplies are dwindling.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

image: Ebola on the Move

Ebola on the Move

By | July 28, 2014

Health officials report the first case of Ebola virus disease outside of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. A 40-year-old man has died in Nigeria.

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

1 Comment

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