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Infants born to mothers who were infected with the virus during pregnancy—including babies who do not show signs of microcephaly—may experience other birth defects.

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image: Cases of Murine Typhus Increasing in Texas

Cases of Murine Typhus Increasing in Texas

By | March 20, 2017

The number of people infected with the fleaborne disease increased from 27 cases in 2003 to 222 in 2013

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If the Affordable Care Act is repealed, the CDC could see a 12.4 percent budget cut.

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image: WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

WHO Lists Antibiotic Development Priorities

By | February 27, 2017

The World Health Organization outlines critical-, high-, and medium-priority antibiotic development initiatives, calling on the public and private sectors to invest in additional R&D.

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image: Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

Wael Al-Delaimy: An American Scientist Born in Iraq

By | February 16, 2017

The 49-year-old epidemiologist immigrated to the U.S. in 2000 for a postdoc position. He’s now a professor of family medicine and public health.

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image: Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

Famed Statistician and Data Visualizer Dies

By | February 8, 2017

Hans Rosling of the Karolinska Institute has passed away at age 68.

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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