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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

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image: Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

By | November 29, 2016

A study of nearly 200,000 children finds no increased risk for autism among kids whose moms caught the flu or received a flu vaccine while pregnant.

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State health officials say a woman has been infected with the virus, possibly as a result of a locally acquired mosquito bite.

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image: Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

By | November 23, 2016

Researchers report on more than a dozen cases in which babies who showed signs of in-utero infection but were born without symptoms of congenital Zika syndrome went on to develop brain abnormalities. 

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Based on epidemiological data, researchers estimate that reducing exposures to certain environmental chemicals could drop people’s chances of developing the disease.

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image: Public Health Leader Dies

Public Health Leader Dies

By | October 26, 2016

Jack Woodall, an epidemiologist and former columnist at The Scientist, cofounded the infectious disease outbreak reporting system ProMED. 

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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