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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

Epigenetics of Embryonic Stem Cells

By | May 14, 2013

Researchers track DNA modifications and gene expression in stem cells as they differentiate.

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image: Week in Review: April 15–19

Week in Review: April 15–19

By | April 19, 2013

Measuring consciousness; unethical data splitting; the deliciousness of beer; autism mutations linked to cannabinoid signaling; arming animals against electron microscopes

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image: Beer Tastes Intoxicating

Beer Tastes Intoxicating

By | April 15, 2013

Just the flavor of beer is enough to boost dopamine in brain areas related to reward—especially in men with alcoholic relatives.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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