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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Is Anatomy Destiny?

Is Anatomy Destiny?

By | March 1, 2015

Alice Dreger, historian of science and author of this month's "Reading Frames," explores the blurry lines between male and female in her 2010 TED talk.

1 Comment

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Dinos on Special Diets

Dinos on Special Diets

By | October 9, 2014

Skull structures suggest that sauropod dinosaur species subsisted on different plant types.

0 Comments

image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

1 Comment

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