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image: The Sodium Cycle

The Sodium Cycle

By | January 8, 2013

Researchers uncover weekly and monthly rhythms of sodium retention and excretion in participants of space simulations.

3 Comments

image: Game On

Game On

By | January 3, 2013

Check out some of the games being used in serious scientific research, education, and treatment.

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image: Biology by the Slice

Biology by the Slice

By | January 3, 2013

German anatomist Christian Wilhelm Braune revolutionized the study of human anatomy in the 19th century with his painstaking drawings of sectioned cadavers.

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image: A Dime a Dozen

A Dime a Dozen

By | January 1, 2013

Affordable diagnostic tests tackle the world’s most pressing health problems.

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image: Games for Science

Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

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image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

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