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A new anatomical view of the mesentery, which surrounds the lower abdomen, suggests that it should be considered the human body’s 79th organ.

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image: Why Can’t Macaques Talk Like Humans?

Why Can’t Macaques Talk Like Humans?

By | December 13, 2016

Anatomical analysis suggests monkeys possess all the hardware for human-like speech, they just lack the neurological capacity to use it.

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image: Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

By | November 1, 2016

The results suggest that breathing is orchestrated by three—rather than two—excitatory circuits in the medulla.

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image: Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

By | November 1, 2016

This third excitatory network helps to regulate postinspiration.

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image: Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

By | September 1, 2016

Drosophila antennae let the insects seek out moisture levels they like best.

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image: Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

By | September 1, 2016

The second visual field may aid in navigation.

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image: Giraffe in Half

Giraffe in Half

By | February 1, 2016

Watch footage from the public dissection of Marius, the young giraffe at the Copenhagen Zoo who was ultimately fed to predators at the facility. (CAUTION: GRAPHIC IMAGES)

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

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image: <em>Homo naledi</em>’s Hands and Feet

Homo naledi’s Hands and Feet

By | October 6, 2015

Two new analyses of fossil remains from the recently discovered human relative suggest the species may have been uniquely adapted to both terrestrial and arboreal locomotion.

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