Advertisement

The Scientist

» anatomy

Most Recent

image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: Is Anatomy Destiny?

Is Anatomy Destiny?

By | March 1, 2015

Alice Dreger, historian of science and author of this month's "Reading Frames," explores the blurry lines between male and female in her 2010 TED talk.

1 Comment

image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

0 Comments

image: Dinos on Special Diets

Dinos on Special Diets

By | October 9, 2014

Skull structures suggest that sauropod dinosaur species subsisted on different plant types.

0 Comments

image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

1 Comment

image: Anatomy for Everybody

Anatomy for Everybody

By | August 1, 2014

Meet Vanessa Ruiz, the medical illustrator behind the popular art blog Street Anatomy.

0 Comments

image: Imaging Intercourse, 1493

Imaging Intercourse, 1493

By | July 1, 2014

For centuries, scientists have been trying to understand the mechanics of human intercourse. MRI technology made it possible for them to get an inside view.

0 Comments

image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

2 Comments

image: The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

The Neuron Doctrine, circa 1894

By | November 1, 2013

Santiago Ramón y Cajal used a staining technique developed by Camillo Golgi to formulate the idea that the neuron is the basic unit of the nervous system.

1 Comment

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  2. A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865
    Foundations A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

    This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

  3. Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
  4. Image of the Day: Colorful Corn
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies