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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Reveling in the Revealed

Reveling in the Revealed

By | January 1, 2016

A growing toolbox for surveying the activity of entire genomes

2 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Legacies Left Behind in 2015

Legacies Left Behind in 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A look at the contributions of some of the prominent researchers who died this year

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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