The Scientist

» genetics & genomics and culture

Most Recent

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

0 Comments

image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

0 Comments

image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

1 Comment

image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

0 Comments

image: 2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2014

This year’s data reveal notable variation in compensation for life scientists working in different fields, sectors, and regions of the world.

7 Comments

image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.

0 Comments

image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

0 Comments

image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”

0 Comments

image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham