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image: Competition for CRISPR Commercialization

Competition for CRISPR Commercialization

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers stake their proprietary claim on the genome-editing technique.

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image: It’s an Antibiotic-Resistant World

It’s an Antibiotic-Resistant World

By | May 1, 2014

Bacteria all over the globe are evolving tricks to survive humanity’s arsenal of antibiotics, and the World Health Organization has officially sounded the alarm.

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image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: Sharing the Wealth

Sharing the Wealth

By | May 1, 2014

From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?

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image: Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

By | May 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 38

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image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

3 Comments

image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

1 Comment

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