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image: One Gene, Two Mutations

One Gene, Two Mutations

By | November 5, 2013

Knocking down a single gene spurs pronounced secondary effects in the yeast genome.

6 Comments

image: Prominent Geneticist Dies

Prominent Geneticist Dies

By | November 5, 2013

Leonard Herzenberg, who helped to develop the first fluorescence-activated cell sorter, has passed away at age 81.

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image: Week in Review: October 28–November 1

Week in Review: October 28–November 1

By | November 1, 2013

Neuronal DNA variation; male hormone sparks mosquito egg production; pulvinar neurons aid primate snake detection; spiders and cryptic female choice

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image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | November 1, 2013

A rare bleeding disorder leads scientists to uncover an unusual blood component that might be common to us all.

1 Comment

image: Exploring the Neuron Forest

Exploring the Neuron Forest

By | November 1, 2013

Innovations in imaging techniques and genetic sequencing take neuroscience to a new level.

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image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.

10 Comments

image: Lozano on DBS

Lozano on DBS

By | November 1, 2013

Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano discusses deep-brain stimulation in this TEDx talk.

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image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

1 Comment

image: The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

The Psychiatrist’s Jigsaw

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers are piecing together the devilishly complex sets of genetic alterations underlying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

4 Comments

image: Waste-Management Consultant

Waste-Management Consultant

By | November 1, 2013

By audaciously pursuing an abandoned area of research, Ana María Cuervo discovered how cells selectively break down their waste, and revealed the health consequences when that process malfunctions.

0 Comments

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