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BD Biosciences
BD Biosciences

The Scientist

» human genetics and developmental biology

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

1 Comment

image: The First Americans

The First Americans

By | July 23, 2015

Two genetic studies seeking to determine how people first migrated to North and South America yield different results.

1 Comment

image: Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

By | July 20, 2015

Researchers link variations in two genes to cases of major depressive disorder in two large cohorts.

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image: Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

By | July 15, 2015

Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

By | June 8, 2015

A large-scale genome sequencing effort identifies mutations with disease-causing potential at higher rates than expected.

3 Comments

image: Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

By | June 5, 2015

Somatic mosaicism may be responsible for a larger proportion of genomic variability within humans than previously thought.

2 Comments

image: Genomes Point the Way

Genomes Point the Way

By | May 28, 2015

Sequence analysis of Egyptian, Ethiopian, and non-African peoples indicates a likely route taken by modern humans migrating out of Africa.

1 Comment

image: Human Genes Can Save Yeast

Human Genes Can Save Yeast

By | May 21, 2015

Replacing yeast genes with their human equivalents reveals functional conservation despite a billion years of divergent evolution.

2 Comments

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