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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Genomic Elements Reveal Human Diversity

Genomic Elements Reveal Human Diversity

By | August 6, 2015

Duplication of copy number variants may be the source of greatest diversity among people, researchers find.

1 Comment

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: The First Americans

The First Americans

By | July 23, 2015

Two genetic studies seeking to determine how people first migrated to North and South America yield different results.

1 Comment

image: Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

By | July 20, 2015

Researchers link variations in two genes to cases of major depressive disorder in two large cohorts.

1 Comment

image: Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

By | July 15, 2015

Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.

1 Comment

image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

0 Comments

image: Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

By | June 8, 2015

A large-scale genome sequencing effort identifies mutations with disease-causing potential at higher rates than expected.

3 Comments

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