The Scientist

» human genetics and ecology

Most Recent

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: The First Americans

The First Americans

By | July 23, 2015

Two genetic studies seeking to determine how people first migrated to North and South America yield different results.

1 Comment

image: Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

Genetic Variants Linked to Depression

By | July 20, 2015

Researchers link variations in two genes to cases of major depressive disorder in two large cohorts.

1 Comment

image: Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some

By | July 15, 2015

Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.

1 Comment

image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

0 Comments

image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

0 Comments

image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

0 Comments

image: Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

Disease-Causing Mutations in Healthy People

By | June 8, 2015

A large-scale genome sequencing effort identifies mutations with disease-causing potential at higher rates than expected.

3 Comments

image: Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

Mosaic Mutations May Not Be Rare

By | June 5, 2015

Somatic mosaicism may be responsible for a larger proportion of genomic variability within humans than previously thought.

2 Comments

image: Genomes Point the Way

Genomes Point the Way

By | May 28, 2015

Sequence analysis of Egyptian, Ethiopian, and non-African peoples indicates a likely route taken by modern humans migrating out of Africa.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS