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image: Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

By | January 22, 2016

Honeybee seminal fluid contains two different components that fight Nosema fungus.

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image: Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

By | January 21, 2016

Human monoclonal antibodies induced during Ebola infection are able to neutralize related viral species, scientists show. 

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image: Processing Faces

Processing Faces

By | January 21, 2016

Other people’s faces are mapped onto our brains.

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image: Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

By | January 20, 2016

A public-health nonprofit and an international drugmaker team up to stockpile hundreds of thousands of doses of a promising vaccine and to speed along the approval process.

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image: Cocaine Induces Neuronal Autophagy

Cocaine Induces Neuronal Autophagy

By | January 19, 2016

A new study supports the idea that cocaine triggers brain cells to eat themselves and suggests a possible antidote.

2 Comments

image: Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

Cord Blood Cells Foretell Food Allergy

By | January 13, 2016

Scientists link an immune phenotype present at birth to the development of food allergies a year later.

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image: How Blasts Affect the Brain

How Blasts Affect the Brain

By | January 13, 2016

Repeated exposure to explosions can damage the cerebellum in combat veterans and mouse models alike.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

Brain-Training Firm, FTC Settle

By | January 6, 2016

San Francisco-based Lumos Labs, creator of the brain-training program Lumosity, will pay $2 million to settle deceptive-advertising charges raised by the US Federal Trade Commission.

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image: Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

Molecular Fingerprint Predicts Flu Shot Response

By | January 4, 2016

A gene-expression signature correlates with a person’s likelihood of experiencing adverse events after receiving a seasonal flu vaccine, scientists show. 

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