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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: AAUP Champion Dies

AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

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image: Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

By | January 22, 2016

Honeybee seminal fluid contains two different components that fight Nosema fungus.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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