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image: Little White and the Three Toxins

Little White and the Three Toxins

By | May 1, 2013

Previously unknown poisonous compounds isolated from a new species of mushroom may be responsible for the deaths of hundreds in China, but precisely how the fungus killed its victims is not clear.

2 Comments

image: American Chestnut to Rise Again

American Chestnut to Rise Again

By | October 5, 2012

The American chestnut tree, almost wiped out by a fungus from Asia, could soon be resurrected in blight-resistant form.

3 Comments

image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

3 Comments

image: New Life for Old Grounds

New Life for Old Grounds

By | August 21, 2012

Used ground coffee and other café food waste could one day be converted into plastics, detergents and other products.

1 Comment

image: Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

Frog-Killing Fungus Thrives

By | August 15, 2012

Global trade in live bullfrogs and a more volatile, changing climate worsen a deadly amphibian fungus.

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 28, 2012

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Banana Fungus Origin Revealed

Banana Fungus Origin Revealed

By | March 6, 2012

A fungal disease that is plaguing banana plants around the world originated in South East Asia.

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image: Deadly Bat Fungus Nailed Down

Deadly Bat Fungus Nailed Down

By | October 26, 2011

Scientists have made a definitive link between a recently-discovered fungus and a lethal disease wiping out bat populations in eastern North America.

12 Comments

image: Fair Trade at Plant Roots

Fair Trade at Plant Roots

By | August 11, 2011

Plant and fungal symbionts swap more resources with partners that provide a greater return of nutrients.

3 Comments

image: One Pathogen, Two Biofilms

One Pathogen, Two Biofilms

By | August 5, 2011

A single fungal species can form two different kinds of biofilms—a pathogenic one and a sexual one.

0 Comments

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