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Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression

Physical Force Upregulates Gene Expression

By | August 24, 2016

Applying a mechanical force that pulls on a cell stretches chromatin, facilitating transcription, scientists show.

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Instant Messaging

By | May 1, 2016

An alternative route to sparking cell signals involves hook-ups between transmembrane and soluble ligands.

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image: Kissing Cousins

Kissing Cousins

By | May 1, 2016

Researchers discover a completely novel mechanism of cell signaling involving soluble chemokines and their transmembrane equivalents.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

Discoverer of G Proteins Dies

By | December 29, 2015

Nobel laureate Alfred Gilman has passed away at age 74.

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image: Heady Stuff

Heady Stuff

By | November 1, 2015

New research on how fat influences brain neuronal activity

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