Advertisement

The Scientist

» addiction and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Tracking Fecal Transplants

Tracking Fecal Transplants

By | November 26, 2013

A long-term study confirms transplants of stool microbes from healthy donors can successfully clear recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

2 Comments

image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

By | November 15, 2013

Researchers pinpoint the interpeduncular nucleus as the home of nicotine withdrawal, suggesting that treatments targeted to region may aid smoking cessation.

0 Comments

image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

0 Comments

image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

1 Comment

image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

2 Comments

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. The Zombie Literature
    Features The Zombie Literature

    Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

  2. First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy
  3. Locating Language within the Brain
  4. The Two Faces of Fish Oil
    Notebook The Two Faces of Fish Oil

    The discovery of a tumor-protecting role for a fatty acid found in fish oil has sparked debate about the product’s safety.

Advertisement
Gilson
Gilson
Advertisement
RayBioTech