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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

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image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

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image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

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image: Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

By | November 15, 2013

Researchers pinpoint the interpeduncular nucleus as the home of nicotine withdrawal, suggesting that treatments targeted to region may aid smoking cessation.

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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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