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image: HIV Evolves Vulnerability

HIV Evolves Vulnerability

By | October 22, 2012

In mutating to evade immune detection, HIV becomes susceptible to detection by different antibodies, suggesting new strategies for vaccination.

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image: MRSA on the Loose

MRSA on the Loose

By | October 22, 2012

Wild animals are getting and spreading the deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria.   

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image: Searching for Alien Genomes

Searching for Alien Genomes

By | October 22, 2012

J. Craig Venter plans to develop a machine to find and sequence DNA on Mars, but another genomics mogul, Jonathan Rothberg, may beat him to it.

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image: Bacteriography

Bacteriography

By | October 19, 2012

A scientist-turned-artist cultures bacteria into art.

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image: Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

Biologist Ruffles Feathers on Facebook

By | October 19, 2012

The blogosphere voices widespread condemnation for a sexist comment made by a researcher attending this week’s annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

8 Comments

image: Flooding Rivers with Resistance

Flooding Rivers with Resistance

By | October 18, 2012

A river system in Colorado contains high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes in areas close to water-treatment plants.

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image: Sniffing Out TB

Sniffing Out TB

By | October 18, 2012

An African rat helps detect tuberculosis in Tanzania, prompting the Mozambique government to pursue a similar project.

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image: Epigenetic Enigmas

Epigenetic Enigmas

By | October 17, 2012

Overturning previous studies, a peculiar protozoan mysteriously uses a DNA-markup system to take out the genetic trash.   

1 Comment

image: A Parasite’s Parasites

A Parasite’s Parasites

By | October 15, 2012

French scientists identify a new giant virus, which carries the genome of a smaller virus and a new breed of mobile DNA.

5 Comments

image: Mites Remember Enemies, Fight Back

Mites Remember Enemies, Fight Back

By | October 12, 2012

Mites that were attacked by rival species as juveniles attack the young of their former assailants more frequently when they reach adulthood.

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