The Scientist

» addiction and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Intracellular Spirals

Intracellular Spirals

By | December 1, 2013

Membrane twists connect stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets.

0 Comments

image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

1 Comment

image: Proto-Organelles for Synthetic Cells

Proto-Organelles for Synthetic Cells

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers construct lipid-encapsulated compartments within synthetic cells.

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: One Man's Trash...

One Man's Trash...

By | December 1, 2013

Scientists who dared to waste their time looking at the midbody, a remnant of cell division, have catapulted the organelle to new prominence.

2 Comments

image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | December 1, 2013

The causes of a cell’s three-dimensional structure remain a fundamental mystery of cell biology.

7 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself
  2. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
  3. Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked
    The Nutshell Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked

    According to a document posted online less than a day before the release of the official 2018 budget proposal, the National Institutes of Health could face even deeper cuts than previously suggested by the Trump administration.

  4. Cooking Up Cancer?
    Notebook Cooking Up Cancer?

    Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

AAAS