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image: CDC Offers Advice to Limit Opioid Scripts

CDC Offers Advice to Limit Opioid Scripts

By | March 17, 2016

Aimed at primary care providers, the recommendations encourage non-narcotic alternatives or short-term opioid prescriptions and patient monitoring.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

Christie Fowler: Addicted to Research

By | January 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior University of California, Irvine. Age: 39

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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