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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Pain and Progress

Pain and Progress

By | February 1, 2014

Is it possible to make a nonaddictive opioid painkiller?

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

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image: Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

By | November 15, 2013

Researchers pinpoint the interpeduncular nucleus as the home of nicotine withdrawal, suggesting that treatments targeted to region may aid smoking cessation.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Get Off the Pot

Get Off the Pot

By | October 15, 2013

Researchers demonstrate the successful treatment of marijuana abuse in rats and monkeys.

4 Comments

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