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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

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image: Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

By | November 15, 2013

Researchers pinpoint the interpeduncular nucleus as the home of nicotine withdrawal, suggesting that treatments targeted to region may aid smoking cessation.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Get Off the Pot

Get Off the Pot

By | October 15, 2013

Researchers demonstrate the successful treatment of marijuana abuse in rats and monkeys.

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image: Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

By | September 19, 2013

The body’s own pain-quelling system may be at the root of chronic pain and symptoms of opioid withdrawal, according to a new study in mice.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

By | August 15, 2013

Mice whose brains express the HIV-1 Tat protein show a heightened response to the drug and appear more vulnerable to relapse.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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