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image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

2 Comments

image: Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

Suppressing Drug-Seeking Behaviors

By | November 24, 2013

Augmenting the action of a glutamate receptor in the brains of addicted rats helps prevent them from seeking cocaine during withdrawal, a study shows.

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image: Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

Brain’s Nicotine Center Found

By | November 15, 2013

Researchers pinpoint the interpeduncular nucleus as the home of nicotine withdrawal, suggesting that treatments targeted to region may aid smoking cessation.

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Get Off the Pot

Get Off the Pot

By | October 15, 2013

Researchers demonstrate the successful treatment of marijuana abuse in rats and monkeys.

4 Comments

image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

image: Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

Natural Opioids Linked to Chronic Pain

By | September 19, 2013

The body’s own pain-quelling system may be at the root of chronic pain and symptoms of opioid withdrawal, according to a new study in mice.

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image: HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

HIV Protein Boosts Cocaine's Effect

By | August 15, 2013

Mice whose brains express the HIV-1 Tat protein show a heightened response to the drug and appear more vulnerable to relapse.

1 Comment

image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

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