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image: Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

Gene Drive’s Achilles Heel

By | May 22, 2017

Rare genetic variants could blunt efforts to destroy pest populations. 

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 28, 2017

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 21, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Beetle Bomb

Beetle Bomb

By | May 1, 2015

High-speed X-ray video reveals how bombardier beetles control their toxic sprays.

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image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

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image: Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

Dung Beetles Navigate by Sunlight

By | January 7, 2014

Shortly after demonstrating dung beetles’ ability to navigate by the stars, researchers in Sweden provide evidence that the insects can also use the sun to find their way.

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image: Science with a Sense of Humor

Science with a Sense of Humor

By | September 13, 2013

Researchers who studied stargazing dung beetles, opera-loving mice are among recipients of this year’s Ig Nobel Prizes.

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image: Right Under Their Noses

Right Under Their Noses

By | September 6, 2013

Biology students discover a new species of beetle in the giant city of Manila.

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image: Life (Re)Cycle

Life (Re)Cycle

By | August 1, 2012

Death breeds life in the world’s most diverse and abundant group of animals.

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image: Beetles Stay True to Their Colors

Beetles Stay True to Their Colors

By | September 30, 2011

Fifteen to 47-million-year-old fossil beetles have retained their structural colors almost intact.

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