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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 


image: More Mini Brains

More Mini Brains

By | February 17, 2016

Simple versions of brain organoids could serve as new models for testing the effects of drugs, researchers reported at this year’s AAAS meeting. 


image: Chat With Charlie

Chat With Charlie

By | February 1, 2016

See a preview of the app that lets you ask questions of a virtual Charles Darwin.


image: Getting the Word Out

Getting the Word Out

By | February 1, 2016

In a shifting media landscape with a growing public interest in science, some researchers are doing their own PR.


image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.


image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.


image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 


image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.


image: More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

More Evidence of Alzheimer’s Transmission

By | January 27, 2016

Examining the brains of seven patients who died of the prion disease called Creutzfeldt–Jakob, researchers find signs of Alzheimer’s pathology. 

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