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image: Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

Neglected Babies Develop Less Myelin

By | September 17, 2012

Mice raised in isolation from their mothers developed cognitive deficits similar to those of babies raised in orphanages where physical contact is infrequent.

2 Comments

image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: Opinion: Scientists’ Intuitive Failures

Opinion: Scientists’ Intuitive Failures

By | July 23, 2012

Much of what researchers believe about the public and effective communication is wrong.

26 Comments

image: The Bug Zoo

The Bug Zoo

By | July 6, 2012

A Canadian menagerie lets visitors get up close and personal with insects to help make crawlies less creepy.

4 Comments

image: Meet the Bugs

Meet the Bugs

By | July 6, 2012

The Victoria Bug Zoo is extremely small. In 1997, the Zoo's founder, Carol Maier, started the collection, which now includes more than 50 insect species, after completing her entomology degree from the University of Guelph. 

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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