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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: The Devil’s Details

The Devil’s Details

By | November 1, 2014

With the iconic Australian marsupial carnivore on the brink of extinction, Tasmanian researchers race to unlock the immunological mysteries of a disease threatening the species.

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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

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image: Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

By | September 23, 2014

Lengthy stints in intensive care units pare down patients’ gut microflora, a study shows.

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image: Small Molecule Superstore

Small Molecule Superstore

By | September 15, 2014

An analysis of bacterial sequences from the Human Microbiome Project has uncovered thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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