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image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

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image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

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image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is associated with sea star wasting disease.

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image: Probing Starling Sleep

Probing Starling Sleep

By | November 18, 2014

Birds may provide a new animal model for memory consolidation during sleep, according to research presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week.

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image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

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image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper

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image: DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

By | November 11, 2014

Sequencing study reveals low levels of microbes in lab reagents that can create big problems for some microbiome studies.

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image: Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

Takaki Komiyama: Circuit Seeker

By | November 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Neurobiology Section, University of California, San Diego. Age: 35

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image: Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Allison Doupe, a neuroscientist known for her work exploring the neural mechanisms of learning, has passed away.

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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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