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image: Chinese Biosafety Concerns

Chinese Biosafety Concerns

By | September 14, 2011

A bacterial outbreak at a Chinese University prompts the firing of administrators and highlights more systemic concerns.

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image: Secrets of Aging

Secrets of Aging

By | September 1, 2011

What does a normally aging brain look like? Are diseases of aging such as Alzheimer’s inevitable?

78 Comments

image: <em>Art + Science Now</em>

Art + Science Now

By | September 1, 2011

The book that serves as bio art's encyclopedia.

6 Comments

image: Lost in Space

Lost in Space

By | September 1, 2011

Looking for a more realistic way to study memory, we turned to place cells­­—­a network of cells that record a rat’s memory of an environment. 

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image: Molecular Learning

Molecular Learning

By | September 1, 2011

Long-term potentiation (LTP), discovered in the 1970s, was later shown to be the molecular basis of memory. 

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image: The Seat of Memory

The Seat of Memory

By | September 1, 2011

Early on, researchers had learned that the hippocampus was the structure in the brain where long-term memories were created and stored, but it was not known whether the different cell types within this structure might be more or less susceptible to the aging process.

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image: Piggyback Pathogen

Piggyback Pathogen

By | September 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Immunology

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image: The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics

The Age-Old Fight Against Antibiotics

By | August 31, 2011

Researchers find antibiotic resistance genes in 30,000-year-old bacteria, suggesting such resistance is not a modern phenomenon.

12 Comments

image: Role of Nurture in Spatial Abilities

Role of Nurture in Spatial Abilities

By | August 29, 2011

In matriarchal societies where women receive equal education, there is no difference in spatial abilities between men and women.

6 Comments

image: Fair Trade at Plant Roots

Fair Trade at Plant Roots

By | August 11, 2011

Plant and fungal symbionts swap more resources with partners that provide a greater return of nutrients.

3 Comments

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