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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

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image: Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

By | March 14, 2016

Scientists image the activity of adult-born neurons in the brains of waking mice, and reveal roles for the cells in learning and memory.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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image: Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

Giant Virus Has CRISPR-like Immune Defense

By | March 2, 2016

The genome of a mimivirus strain resistant to a virophage has repeated phage sequences alongside nuclease- and helicase-coding sections.

1 Comment

image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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image: Learning with the Lights Out

Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

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image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: Things That Go Bump

Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

2 Comments

image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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