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image: Science on Celluloid

Science on Celluloid

By | February 28, 2013

Scientist? Filmmaker? Alexis Gambis welcomes both labels.

3 Comments

image: Playing for Words

Playing for Words

By | February 28, 2013

Children with dyslexia have an easier time learning to read after playing action video games that don’t incorporate reading.

2 Comments

image: Hearing Through the Chaos

Hearing Through the Chaos

By | February 21, 2013

Using Bluetooth devices in classrooms reverses dyslexia and improves reading ability.

0 Comments

image: Prions Involved in Learning

Prions Involved in Learning

By | February 15, 2013

Properly folded prions aid in normal brain development.

0 Comments

image: Through the Eyes of a Giant

Through the Eyes of a Giant

By | February 15, 2013

A new play explores the mind of the father of modern physics through his interactions—factual and imagined—with a curmudgeonly colleague.

1 Comment

image: Open-Review Journal Launched

Open-Review Journal Launched

By | February 13, 2013

A new journal that publishes peer review comments alongside its manuscripts goes live.

2 Comments

image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

By | February 11, 2013

Why so few scientists make the leap to policy-making positions, and why more should give it a try

0 Comments

image: Some Girls Better at Science

Some Girls Better at Science

By | February 5, 2013

Globally, 15-year-old girls outscored boys in 43 of the 65 countries tested.

2 Comments

image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

1 Comment

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