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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye

By | March 1, 2016

New insomnia drugs are coming on the market, but drug-free therapy remains the most durable treatment.

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In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

By | March 1, 2016

Unearthing the root causes of narcolepsy keeps Emmanuel Mignot tackling one of sleep science’s toughest questions.

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Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

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Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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Things That Go Bump

By | March 1, 2016

Scientists still don’t know why animals sleep or how to define the ubiquitous behavior.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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