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image: J&J to Share Trial Data

J&J to Share Trial Data

By | January 31, 2014

The pharmaceutical giant teams up with Yale University to make raw clinical data available to researchers.

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

By | January 15, 2014

Migratory locusts are less likely to aggregate into crop-devastating swarms when infected by the parasite Paranosema locustae.

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image: Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

Microbes Expel Swarms of Vesicles

By | January 10, 2014

Scientists present the first evidence that marine cyanobacteria release vesicles—billions and billions of vesicles.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

Superbug Sickens Dozens in Illinois

By | January 9, 2014

A single hospital was at the epicenter of an outbreak of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

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image: UK Government Laments Tamiflu Secrets

UK Government Laments Tamiflu Secrets

By | January 6, 2014

A parliamentary committee says drugmakers have not disclosed enough data on the anti-influenza medicine.

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image: Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

Benjamin tenOever: Going Viral

By | January 1, 2014

Professor, Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Age: 36

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image: Farmer Fungi

Farmer Fungi

By | January 1, 2014

Researchers uncover an unprecedented relationship between morels and bacteria. But can it be called agriculture?

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image: tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

tenOever on microRNA and Vaccines

By | January 1, 2014

January 2014 Scientist to Watch Benjamin tenOever discusses his research.

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