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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: UK Government Laments Tamiflu Secrets

UK Government Laments Tamiflu Secrets

By | January 6, 2014

A parliamentary committee says drugmakers have not disclosed enough data on the anti-influenza medicine.

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image: Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

Raw Data’s Vanishing Act

By | December 23, 2013

As scientific publications age, the data that undergird them are disappearing at an alarming rate.

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image: Open-Access Genomes

Open-Access Genomes

By | November 8, 2013

The U.K.’s newly launched Personal Genome Project seeks volunteers.  

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Data Drive

Data Drive

By | October 1, 2013

Solutions for sharing, storing, and analyzing big data

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image: Data Sharing Goes Linux

Data Sharing Goes Linux

By | August 27, 2013

A life-science information platform joins the nonprofit organization that helped develop the open-source operating system.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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