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The Scientist

» data sharing and developmental biology

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image: Not-So-Informed Consent

Not-So-Informed Consent

By | June 21, 2012

Growing databanks are invaluable to biomedical researchers, but patients are often unaware of what their information is used for.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

FDA Disputes Data Under-Reporting

By | May 2, 2012

The FDA and NIH dispute reports that clinical trial data is being under-reported.

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image: Cooking Up Creative Solutions

Cooking Up Creative Solutions

By | May 1, 2012

More collaborators and more data are the key ingredients.

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image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: Data Diving

Data Diving

By | May 1, 2012

What lies untapped beneath the surface of published clinical trial analyses could rock the world of independent review.

28 Comments

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