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image: Best Places to Work Academia, 2012

Best Places to Work Academia, 2012

By | August 1, 2012

On the 10th anniversary of The Scientist’s survey of life science academics, institutions are contending with tighter budgets and larger administrative staffs, while working to sustain and inspire their researchers.

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Whither Science Publishing?

By | August 1, 2012

As we stand on the brink of a new scientific age, how researchers should best communicate their findings and innovations is hotly debated in the publishing trenches.

18 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

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image: The Ultimate Social Data

The Ultimate Social Data

By | July 26, 2012

Facebook is considering allowing scientists to evaluate its user data without breaching its privacy policies.

1 Comment

image: A Little Help from My Friends

A Little Help from My Friends

By | July 1, 2012

How to get the most out of your collaboration with bioinformaticians

2 Comments

image: Not-So-Informed Consent

Not-So-Informed Consent

By | June 21, 2012

Growing databanks are invaluable to biomedical researchers, but patients are often unaware of what their information is used for.

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image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

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