The Scientist

» electron microscopy

Most Recent

Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

1 Comment

image: Doors and Pores

Doors and Pores

By | December 1, 2016

The awesome architecture of the gateways to the nucleus

0 Comments

image: Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

By | November 3, 2016

A new technique creates colorful stains that label proteins and cellular structures at higher resolution than ever before possible. 

0 Comments

image: Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

By | October 1, 2016

From confocal fluorescence microscopy to super-resolution and live 3-D imaging, microscopes have changed rapidly since 1986.

0 Comments

image: First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

By | September 8, 2016

The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring.

0 Comments

image: Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

By | June 1, 2016

In a $4.2 billion deal, the science equipment giant is buying the Hillsboro, Oregon-based electron microscope maker.

0 Comments

image: Zika Up Close

Zika Up Close

By | March 31, 2016

A detailed structure of the pathogen highlights its similarities to—and one major difference from—other flaviviruses. 

0 Comments

image: Micro Master

Micro Master

By | January 1, 2015

Thomas Deerinck has been at the helm of a microscope for more than four decades. And he’s got lots to show for it, including a half a dozen placements in the Nikon Small World competition.

0 Comments

image: Seeing Double

Seeing Double

By | November 1, 2013

Combining two imaging techniques integrates molecular specificity with nanometer-scale resolution.  

0 Comments

image: Scientists Make Retina Wiring Diagram

Scientists Make Retina Wiring Diagram

By | August 7, 2013

Researchers have created a neural wiring diagram of a chunk of mouse retina by analyzing thousands of electron microscopy images.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Stomach Cells Change Identity to Drive Precancerous State
  4. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
AAAS