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image: It’s Over, Man

It’s Over, Man

By | February 1, 2015

The era of human male domination is ending. Will modern culture welcome the dawn of a new gender equality?

7 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2015

February 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Sonic Experiment

Sonic Experiment

By | January 29, 2015

An artist takes advantage of muscle-mimicking polymers to manipulate sounds.

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image: Zooming In

Zooming In

By | January 20, 2015

To improve the reach of optical microscopy, researchers are enlarging the biological features they wish to view.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

By | December 23, 2014

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

0 Comments

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