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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

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image: Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

By | August 31, 2016

Using an MRI scanner to examine how dogs’ brains process speech, researchers find that our canine companions hear both what we say and how we say it. 

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image: Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

By | August 15, 2016

Louis Herman, who made seminal discoveries on dolphin cognition, has passed away at age 86.

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image: TS Picks: August 9, 2016

TS Picks: August 9, 2016

By | August 9, 2016

Gene therapy money-back guarantee; the brain benefits from bilingualism; Q&A with a science watchdog

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

Is Bilingualism Good for Kids?

By | July 1, 2016

New research suggests that raising kids in a dual-language environment might be better for their verbal development than previously realized.  

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