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image: Week in Review: August 12–16

Week in Review: August 12–16

By | August 16, 2013

Engineered immune cells attack tumors; a mouth microbe that can cause cancer; HIV may heighten cocaine’s high; craving high-fat foods

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image: Language Makes the Invisible Visible

Language Makes the Invisible Visible

By | August 12, 2013

Hearing the name of an object may make people more likely to see it.

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image: Bird Song Explains Why Babies Babble

Bird Song Explains Why Babies Babble

By | July 2, 2013

Both birds and children struggle to learn transitions between syllables, practicing them extensively as they learn to speak or sing.

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image: Predicting Autism’s Path

Predicting Autism’s Path

By | May 31, 2013

How brains of toddlers with autism respond to language is associated with later cognitive abilities.

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image: Website Tracks Happiness Using Twitter

Website Tracks Happiness Using Twitter

By | May 1, 2013

The day of the Boston Marathon bombings scored lower on the index than any other day since measurements began nearly 5 years ago.

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image: Language Gene More Active in Girls

Language Gene More Active in Girls

By | February 21, 2013

One gene involved in speech produces more of its protein in the brains of young girls than boys.

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image: Hearing Through the Chaos

Hearing Through the Chaos

By | February 21, 2013

Using Bluetooth devices in classrooms reverses dyslexia and improves reading ability.

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image: Watson’s Potty Mouth

Watson’s Potty Mouth

By | January 15, 2013

IBM programmers had to clean up the super computer’s language after it learned profanity on the Internet.

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image: Hand Signs for Science

Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2012

December 2012's selection of notable quotes

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